Romancing words with Varsha Dixit: Rightfully Wrong Wrongfully Right


 

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Varsha Dixit

Interview: Varsha Dixit

Love can be a bitch like Karma…it’s in the air, steamy and manipulative. Who doesn’t know Varsha Dixit, author of ‘Right Fit Wrong Shoe’, ‘Wrong Means Right End’ who is wooing us with her latest tale of romance, Rightfully Wrong Wrongfully Right. Her books make love and characters real and true to life with punch lines that capture the fancy of readers. Varsha is one writer who knows the pulse of young readers by heart.  Today, I host on the blog the author of Rightfully Wrong Wrongfully Right, Varsha Dixit, who speaks on what makes romance tick for her and like her books, she has a story worth telling.

Varsha Dixit is the bestselling author of contemporary romance. ‘Rightfully Wrong Wrongfully Right’ her latest book released in August 2016 and is available online and in bookstores. To find out more about Varsha and her books visit her website www.varshadixit.com. Connect with Varsha on her author’s page, Facebook  and onTwitter. Buy the book here.

  1. Rightfully Wrong Wrongfully Right is the third installment after ‘Right Fit Wrong Shoe’, ‘Wrong Means Right End’, set in Mumbai where you have painted the nuance and complexity of your character Viraj who made a deathly decision a long time ago. Does the book take off where you have left your last two outings?

 Even though all three books, ‘Right Fit Wrong Shoe’, ‘Wrong Means Right End’ and ‘Rightfully Wrong Wrongfully Right’, are a part of the series they can be read as stand-alone. Each book is the story of one character with other characters from the older books playing supporting roles.

2. In the book excerpt, you made use of Hindi films lingo, ‘Old Singham was the new Prem’, as a reference to Masala movies. Like many, have you grown up watching Hindi movies and how much of their influence is present in your writings?

 Thank you for noticing that J. Like most of my generation, I have grown up watching Hindi films. And, yes they have left an indelible mark somewhere in my mind. In my books, my characters are in their late twenties or early thirties and their language is informal and full of colloquial references.  Thus, movie dialogues just found a way in the book.

3. Having grown up in Mumbai and settled in US, Rightfully Wrong and Wrongfully Right is set in the city along with the earlier two books while Only Wheat Not White was a complete US of A adventure. Can you share with us the role played by both places in your narration and its influence on you?

I was born and raised in India and then after marriage, in my late twenties, I moved to USA. I have lived in USA for more than decade now. I truly feel myself to be the citizen of two countries and my life feels much more enriched because of my exposure to such beautiful countries and cultures. Through my books, I desire to share with the readers my varied experiences. Thus, the ‘Right and Wrong’ series was set in India and ‘Only Wheat Not White’ and ‘Xcess Baggage’ set in USA.

4. How did the idea of making Right Fit Wrong Shoe cropped up that lead to the other two books? While you were writing the first one, did it cross your mind of making back-to-back sequels?

Friendships have always played a very important role in my life and continue to do so. Friends are the family we choose and I have to say I chose well. However, I wanted to write a story about differences and acceptance. My ‘Right and Wrong’ series is about three friends, three different women in three different phases of their lives. ‘Right Fit Wrong Shoe’ was about a small town simple girl, ‘Wrong Means Right End’ was about a divorced young mom and ‘Rightfully Wrong Wrongfully Right’ is about Gayatri Dutta, the woman who has gone out of her way to mess up other people’s life. Now it is the reader’s turn to know the ‘how’ and ‘why’ about Gayatri and the mad scientist, Viraj Dheer.

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Copyright of Rightfully Wrong, Wrongfully Right@Varsha Dixit

5. As a writer, what influences the characters, setting, and narration in your stories? How much of real life people, events and stories are present in your books?

The characters and their backgrounds, the time and place the story unfolds in influence the narration in my books. I stay away from using any ‘real’ life references. So far my imagination has been able to supply enough plot boilers, romance, and humor to pen five books. J

6. Most of your books are about romance and some very adorable characters that one can easily relate to. What, according to you, makes romance tick and how unique should a story telling be, considering numerous tales of romance is churned out every single day?

Yes, I do write romantic stories and yes there are many others who do the same. However, my stories probably vary from others as my stories are not only about romance. They are about friendships, about sibling relationship, about families and about societies. My stories are a genuine effort, on my part, to provide the milieu of readers, young and old, with a humorous read, without overlooking the intelligence and thinking quotient of our personalities.

7. Love is in the air again…this time it’s steamy and manipulative. There is Nandini, Gayatri, Sneha, Aditya, and Viraj. To what extent you have explored the manipulative streak and conflict in the characters?

 The first book was about a small town girl and the second one about a single, working mother. ‘Rightfully Wrong Wrongfully Right’ is the story of Gayatri Dutta, an NRI girl who decides to settle in India and her ensuing trials and tribulations dealing with the parental and societal pressures. How she comes to be her own person and the man she falls in love with.

In my other books, my protagonists would be considered, ‘good’ by society’s standards but the protagonists of Rightfully Wrong Wrongfully Right, Gayatri Dutta and Viraj Dheer are complicated and not so ‘good’ or ‘right’. I have not changed Gayatri intrinsically, she remains who she is but I have given her a focus, drive, and a backstory which tames her self-destructive tendencies and explains her actions.

8. What is the place research holds in a non-fiction book and love stories? I mean, how one goes about researching in rom-com and the amount of time it takes you to conduct research in your books?

 A very interesting question! I feel research plays a very important role in transforming the ‘reel’ to ‘real’.  No author true to their work should shy from research for that is what makes your story and characters connect with the readers. For rom-coms the research I feel is probably more about locations, dialects and professions of the characters.

9. One topic I would like to discuss with you as an author is plagiarism, piracy and violation of copyrights? Recently, a copy of your book was available on a website for free and what can authors do to stop the piracy scourge? 

 Plagiarism and piracy are the two archenemies of everything ‘creative’. Internet only makes it hard to track down piracy and the perpetrators. For one website you close, 2-4 more open. As an author, I feel it is important to be aware of online piracy and use tools to track such sites and report them to the authorities.

10. How easy or tough does it get for an author to inject one-liners or humor in a book? Also, do you have any plan to toy with campus romance in the future?

The first drafts of my book are straight out a story. The drama, the humor, and one-liners come out in the several rounds of edits that I do. Campus romance? Never say never J. Currently the only stories coming to me are mature romances but tomorrow is another day.

Thank you Vishal for a very interesting questionnaire and for hosting me on your blog. I wish you and all your readers the very best for the future J

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22 thoughts on “Romancing words with Varsha Dixit: Rightfully Wrong Wrongfully Right

  1. I.Loved the word play of the titles … kind of tongue twister when you try to say it all together. Nice to know about the author and thoughts behind the book..

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