Legend of turtledove and messenger of looming danger

They made in movies, Kabutaar the harbinger of hope and playing the purveyor of good and bad news to us. Been party to the whims and fancies of minds blabbering on our lil’ birdies cooing outside the window sills? Legend has it that the turtledove warns us of the the danger looming large in our surrounding so that we are well guarded to ward off evil.

We are settled outside India and mom came to break my concentration yesterday as I was busy figuring out things at the work table. “Do you have few minutes to spare?,”  She asks. I reluctantly nodded, convinced that I’ll be asked to do something in the kitchen, much to my chagrin. She was standing at the door steps and coax me to pay attention in the surrounding. My supine mind fails to hearken to nature’s aesthetic creation that could only be heard tweeting something musical to the ears.

Image credit: Google India

Finally, Mom said, “Dekho Chor (See the thieves)”.

Huh! I was in disbelief wondering whether mom has just lost her mind or taking pleasure in breaking my concentration. I felt like a twit. She told me to listen carefully to the turtledove from afar. The birdie was squiggling in spiraling patterns that I could turn into Anu Malik by composing a song to make the moolah. Mom started with the legend that her father who hails from Bihar told her that whenever the turtledove makes such sound patterns  and indulging in a riff of sort , they sibilantly convey the message, “Dekho Chor! Dekho Chor! Dekho Chor!”

Quite nice and fascinating to hear of the turtle drove being the fey and blessed with super powers which is alien to us, humans. I mean, it might be true- kill my silly mind- but a legend that grand parents are led to believe as it is our country is made up of lotsa superstitious stories in villages that travel cities and the world. Have you heard about the snippet surrounding the turtledoves and other beautiful birds? I wanna know!


Disclaimer: It is a fun post to share with friends and bloggers and I cannot be held to task for spreading superstitions. Believe at your own risk.


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